Solar Eclipse Is Coming

Monday, August 21, 2017 is a very special day! It’s been 38 years since a total solar eclipse was visible in the United States. And it will be another 7 years until it happens again! While it’s not necessarily a once-in-a-lifetime, it will only happen ‘once in a blue moon’ so it’s definitely a big deal! And what better way to experience this celestial event than while camping in the great outdoors? Here are some facts and tips to get your geared up for the 2017 solar eclipse!

So, what is a solar eclipse? When the moon passes between the Earth and the sun, we experience a solar eclipse. For the 2017 solar eclipse, a path, stretching from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina, will experience a TOTAL solar eclipse – where the moon completely covers the sun and there is total darkness (totality). The rest of the country will experience a partial solar eclipse – where the moon covers most, but not all, of the sun’s disk.

Unless you are in the exact location during a moment of totality, you NEVER want to look directly at the sun during a solar eclipse. If you do, you could severely injure your eyes and permanently hurt your vision. You can safely view an eclipse of the sun with direct viewing, using special eclipse glasses/shades, or indirect viewing, where you project an image of the sun onto a screen. Click here for more information on viewing the solar eclipse safely: https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety.

So, what can you expect? If only for a few minutes, wherever you are in the United States, the sky will darken – around 9am PDT if you’re on the west coast, around 4pm EDT if you’re on the east coast, or somewhere in between as the shadow of the moon travels from west to east!

Happy Solar Eclipsing, everyone!

Watch live video streams of this awesome event at from locations across the country at https://www. nasa.gov/eclipselive.

Find more information about the 2017 total solar eclipse at the following links:

https://www.space.com/33797-total-solar-eclipse-2017-guide.html

https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/eclipse-who-what-where-when-and-how

https://www.greatamericaneclipse.com/

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