Spring Ahead #1: Gimme S’more

Graham crackers, chocolate slabs, and marshmallows: simple to construct and sweet to enjoy, the gooey S’more transcends the sum of its parts. Done right, the freshly-toasted marshmallow melts the chocolate, with the sturdy cracker holding everything together while boosting the “ooze” factor. It’s true that packaged S’more-flavored cookies and candy are available in between camping trips, but there’s no match for the authentic char of the firepit and the satisfying squeeze of the sandwich. It’s no wonder we all want “some more”!

Daydreaming about S’more got us thinking: what is the history behind this campfire creation?

First off, we can give thanks to Sylvester Graham, who developed the Graham Cracker in 1829 as a sweeter version of the traditional cracker. We can also credit the invention of the gelatin marshmallow, allowing mass production for the first time and fueling the fad of marshmallow roasts in the 1890s, which newspapers called “an excellent medium for flirtation.”

smores recipeThe basic template for the S’more—cookies and cakes that sandwich a clot of squishy, gooey filling—dominated desserts in the Victorian era. The closest ancestors to S’mores appear to be Mallomars and Moon Pies, introduced in 1913 and 1917. But the first recorded recipe for “Some Mores” was printed in 1927—that’s ninety years ago—by the American Girl Scouts. That’s right, this camping classic is related to the Thin Mint and the Samoa. So when the Girl Scouts introduced its “new” S’mores cookie this year, double-dipped and coated in chocolate, they were really pulling a throwback out of the proverbial pantry.

As for the contraction of S’more: Some say that the sticky nature of the treat makes it impossible to pronounce “Some more.” The original recipe notes that “Though it tastes like ‘some more,’ one is really enough.” But traditions were made to be broken, right?

One thing is for sure: the prospect of S’mores leaves us hungry for s’more (lots more!) camping adventures!

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